Tag Archives: Our Mutual Friend

Our Mutual Friend Tweets: How It Should Have Ended!

Highlights of the final part of the ‘Our Mutual Friend Tweets’ project can now be found on Storify, in which the characters explore their own alternative endings to the story! Click here to catch up on our tweeters’ final reflections on the narrative.

You can also now find all 20 Storify installments of the novel here.

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Podcast: ‘Defining Digital Dickens: Mutual Friends/Virtual Friends’

If you missed our round-table discussion on 21st November, ‘Defining Digital Dickens: Mutual Friends/Virtual Friends’, then you can now listen to a podcast of the event.

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19: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Long Nineteenth Century

The 10th anniversary edition of 19: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Long Century features articles on the Our Mutual Friend reading/blogging project and our Twitter retelling of the novel, written by participants.

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Friday 11 December 2015: Anniversary Issue Launch

19logo

Please join us Friday 11 December for a reception in celebration of the tenth anniversary of Birkbeck’s free online journal 19: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Long Nineteenth Century and the publication of the journal’s tenth-anniversary special issue, edited by Luisa Calè and Ana Parejo Vadillo.

The event will feature a special performance from students on Birkbeck’s MA Text and Performance, performing tweets from Birkbeck’s recently completed Our Mutual Friend Tweets project, which retold Dickens’s Our Mutual Friend via Twitter (@DickensOMF #omftweets).
Date: Friday 11th December 2015.
Time: 6pm onwards, with the Twitter performance at 7pm.
Venue: The Keynes Library, Birkbeck School of Arts, 43 Gordon Square. The Twitter performance will take place in our Theatre Studio (room G10).
Please email an RSVP to C19@bbk.ac.uk (Please indicate if you would like to attend the performance, as spaces are limited.)

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The Story’s End on Twitter

Over on Twitter, some of the novel’s characters are reaching the end of their stories:

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Defining Digital Dickens: Virtual Friends/Mutual Friends

Being-Human

Come and join us at Birkbeck on Saturday 21st November at 3pm for a panel discussion with some of our tweeters about their experiences of tweeting Our Mutual Friend http://bit.ly/1PBXrPW

The event is part of the Defining Digital Dickens strand of the Being Human festival, a country-wide festival of the humanities running from 12th-22nd November 2015.

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Our Mutual Friend Tweets: Part Eighteen

Highlights of the eighteenth part of the ‘Our Mutual Friend Tweets’ project can now be found on Storify! Click here to catch up on the latest developments.

And don’t forget to bookmark ‘Our Mutual Feed‘ to keep up with the story day-to-day.

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Our anonymous tweeters revealed!

Here are some of our anonymous tweeters, revealing their secret identities at this year’s Dickens Day.

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‘“I ought to die, my dear!”’: The ‘Good Death’ and the Penultimate Instalment of Our Mutual Friend

Brett Beasley is a Graduate Student Instructor in the Department of English at Loyola University Chicago.

Penultimate: pene + ultimate; the last one before the last one, the end just before the end, finality – but with a qualifier. Such is the curious quality of any penultimate instalment of a novel. The author, having stretched a narrative across many iterations, now pauses and gathers the strands of the narrative, not yet for the end but for one final deferral.

In the case of Our Mutual Friend, the penultimate instalment is especially important because it is a deferred ending in a novel about deferred endings, specifically deferrals of death. On its broadest level, the narrative follows the effects of the [non-]death of John Harmon, his afterlife as John Rokesmith, and his final resurrection as John Harmon once again. The novel’s minor characters and sub-plots manifest this leitmotif as well: the Boffins’ fortune is born out of discarded materials as are the scraps Jenny Wren reclaims for her dolls’ dresses and Mr. Venus turns bones and bodies into what he calls the ‘“trophies of his art.”’ Critics have identified this curiously undead quality variously as ‘postmortem consciousness’, ‘death in abeyance’, ‘suspended animation’, or simply, ‘limbo’, and have taken correspondingly varied takes on the theme’s ethical, political, religious, and economic implications.

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Month 18 (October 1865): Case Study of the Category Aesthetic in the Nineteenth-Century Novel: The Dolls’ Dressmaker in Our Mutual Friend

Isobel Armstrong is a fellow of the British Academy, Senior Research Fellow of the Institute of English Studies and Professor Emeritus at Birkbeck, University of London. She has published widely on nineteenth-century studies (in particular Victorian Poetry: Poetry, Poetics and Politics, 1993) and theory (see The Radical Aesthetic, 2000). Her most recent book, Victorian Glassworlds. Glass Culture and the Imagination, 2008) won the Modern Language Association’s James Russell Lowell Prize in 2009. This account of the dolls’ dressmaker will appear in her forthcoming monograph on the nineteenth-century novel and the democratic imagination, to be published by Oxford University Press.

This case study is part of a larger discussion of the way the category of the aesthetic in the nineteenth-century novel, introduced either as works of art, creative labour or media, is formative of the novel in that it shapes a reading of radical possibilities. While we too often see the novel as a symptom of history, the aesthetic is one of the ways the novel creates history. It is central to asking what free human personhood is. In the case of the dolls’ dressmaker, the aesthetic encounters ambiguity as art abuts on craft, work and economic law. Attention to the category of the aesthetic and these ambiguities extends our sense of the novel’s inquiry into class and inequality and the social boundaries of inclusion and exclusion. The aesthetic does not enter the novel as an unquestioned democratic good but precisely as a problematical category, which generates interrogatives, prompting questions about the social order that is its context. Seemingly marginal and subsidiary to the main action of the narrative, the dolls’ dressmaker’s presence is a source of questions, and the dolls’ dressmaker’s craft in Dickens’s Our Mutual Friend (1864-65) uses the aesthetic to act as a prompt for radical questions. I identify four such prompts in the following discussion.

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